It’s a beautiful day… and all farmers and gardeners are out and at work!

Again, I’d like to direct you all to the very lovely Writer’s Almanac produced by Garrison Keillor. Today’s April 30th entry includes the following:

On this day in 1852, Henry David Thoreau (books by this author) wrote in his journal, recording his observations of the woods and fields around Concord, Massachusetts. On this day, he wrote:

“Down the Boston road and across to Turnpike, etc., etc. The elms are now generally in blossom and Cheney’s elm still also. The last has leaf-buds which show the white. Now, before any leaves have appeared, their blossoms clothe the trees with a rich, warm brown color, which serves partially for foliage to the street-walker, and makes the tree more obvious. … It is a beautiful day, — a mild air, — and all farmers and gardeners out and at work. Now is the time to set trees and consider what things you will plant in your garden. Yesterday I observed many fields newly plowed, the yellow soil looking very warm and dry in the sun; and one boy had fixed his handkerchief on a stick and elevated it on the yoke, where it flapped or streamed and rippled gaily in the wind, as he drove his oxen dragging a harrow over the plowed field. […] Dodging behind a swell of land to avoid the men who were plowing, I saw unexpectedly (when I looked to see if we were concealed by the field) the blue mountains’ line in the west (the whole intermediate earth and towns being concealed), this greenish field for a foreground sloping upward a few rods, and then those grand mountains seen over it in the background, so blue, —seashore, earth-shore, — and, warm as it is, covered with snow which reflected the sun. Then when I turned, I saw in the cast, just over the woods, the modest, pale, cloud-like moon, two-thirds full, looking spirit-like on these daylight scenes. Such a sight excites me. The earth is worthy to inhabit.”

Oil Rig Explosion

So much awful news about the oil spill off the gulf coast reminds me how deeply I believe what Thoreau wrote so many springs ago, the earth is worthy to inhabit. The question is how well we treat her; and how thoughtfully and carefully we interact with all the wonders she provides.

klc

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